Lifestyle

Day 15: Day By Day

March 1, 2018

Growing up, my siblings and I watched a movie called Godspell nearly every weekend for a long stretch there. for some reason as kids, we would get hooked on just one movie and watch it over and over until my dad could convince us to watch something else. It was like if we stopped watching it, we would never get to see whatever it was we found so attractive about the movie ever again.

Now look… some people really don’t like Godspell. And if you’re one of those people- thats totally cool! But I loved and still truly love this musical/movie. When I was little I always asked my dad why I couldn’t see it on stage, and he would tell me that once we built a time machine I’d be able to (oh but in the end dad won anyways- he took me to see the revival twice the summer it was on broadway :D).

The musical is based mostly on the gospel of Matthew, and puts to folksy tunes the parables held within. Delicious, catchy tunes that an 8 year old would not be able to resist.

I remember every last story clearly, but today’s gospel (albeit told in Luke) was one of the stories portrayed in Godspell. Lazarus was a poor and ailing man who just wanted the scraps from the rich man’s table. Dogs would lick his sores, and the rich man never offered to help him. When they died, the rich man is in hell and Lazarus is in heaven. The rich man calls out begging for water, but Lazarus is not allowed to go, and he is also not allowed to go as a ghost to warn the rich man’s brothers, for they should be decent human beings without the help of a ghost. Okay so I definitely paraphrased that whole story (you can find the real version in the gospel of Luke 16:19-31), but you get the idea.

The moral of the story is that we are supposed to help our brothers and sisters out here on earth, because when we see them, we should be seeing Christ.

Sometimes I find that this is a big moment in my life. I go on a mission trip. I serve with a ministry that is based on the corporal works of mercy. When I have participated in these things, it was easy to see how I was serving Christ in my brothers and sisters. But more often then not, I find that these are small  every day interactions. Staying up with a friend who needs to get something off their chest. Always having room for one more, no matter how last minute it may be. Taking the time to respond to someone who has looked to you for guidance. Writing a letter to someone who is lonely.

These things take time and oftentimes, sacrificing time seems nearly impossible. But I always try to make enough time to see Christ in others. I am always made better for it.

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